Who are the Volunteers? How can I help?

The Scouting organization comprises nearly 1 million volunteers, whose dedication of time and resources has enabled the BSA to remain the nation’s leading youth-serving organization. Leading these volunteers are the Rainbow Council Executive Board, along with Chief Scout Executive, District Director, District Executives for Waapi Lenaswa and Ishkote, our Development Director and our administrative staff. Together we insure the safety and protection of our scouting youth by completing and providing Youth Protection Training, position specific training, and more. We are constantly in need of volunteers for unit leaders and event staff, as well as community partners.

Help Build the Next Generation of Leaders

Through volunteering with the Boy Scouts of America, you will work with youth to build a better future for our country. Scouting volunteers come to Scouting from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. People from just about every occupation imaginable are involved in leading youth to become responsible, caring and competent citizens. You’ll also discover that Scout volunteering will enable you to learn new skills and build lifelong friendships while giving back your community.

 

How can you help? Check out our Volunteer Positions!

Scouting relies on adult volunteers to promote our mission. There are variety of volunteer positions working directly with youth or supporting those that do. Positions vary greatly in time commitment from year round and seasonal to a few hours a week or a few hours a year.

All volunteers must go through an application process that includes a criminal background check requiring a social security number.

Scouting is a youth-led, youth-run program, but the youth must be trained to be leaders. Adult role models in Scouting provide an ideal learning experience for all youth. Every adult volunteer has something valuable to offer. On a typical weekend campout, Scouts might work with an adult volunteer who teaches the Fishing merit badge and with a Scout mom to learn orienteering, go on a 5-mile hike with another adult leader, and end the day learning how to clean and cook fresh fish from someone else.

The advantages of Scouting are not limited to youth. Adults also develop leadership and physical skills with every training experience.

Volunteers learn, too. Volunteers spend a significant amount of time to ensure the success of Scouting in their communities. The average Scout volunteer gives 20 hours of service each month, and 96 percent of volunteers say they would recommend volunteering for the BSA to other adults. In fact, volunteers believe their time invested with the Boy Scouts of America helps them be:

  • A better citizen
  • A better parent
  • A better manager
  • A better employee
  • More patient and tolerant of others
  • More open to new ideas and opinions

We need you to provide the direction, coaching, and training that empowers today’s youth with the skills they will need to lead tomorrow.

Other Ways You Can Help

There are many ways that you can help Scouting in your area. Whether you are volunteering directly with Scouts or helping out behind the scenes, you can make an impact on the lives of Scouts by volunteering your time.

How can you help? Here are a few ideas:

Assisting directly with the Scouts on an ongoing basis

  • Leader (Cubmaster, Den leader, Scoutmaster, Venturing crew Advisor)
  • Assistant leader
  • Board of review coordinator/member
  • Court of honor coordinator/member

Helping directly with the Scouts in specific events or activities

  • Event coordinator/event committee member
  • Pinewood derby coordinator/committee member
  • Service project coordinator/committee member
  • Camping trip participant
  • Banquet coordinator/committee member
  • Day camp coordinator/participant
  • Summer camp coordinator/participant/promotion
  • Merit badge counselor

Support: Administrative Role

  • Advancement committee chair/member
  • Communications committee chair/committee member (Webmaster, PR, newsletter)
  • Secretary: recordkeeping, activity permits, meeting minutes, annual recharter activities
  • Treasurer/assistant treasurer
  • Youth Protection training coordinator
  • Life to Eagle coordinator
  • Merit badge coordinator

Support: Other

  • Chartered organization representative
  • Friends of Scouting coordinator (fund-raising)
  • Unit committee chair/member
  • Unit youth recruiter
  • Product sales committee coordinator/member
  • Promoter of district/council events to parents
  • Religious award committee coordinator/member
  • Trainer
  • District/council committee member
  • Transportation coordinator
  • Historian
  • Quartermaster (supplies)

Leader Training

All courses needed to be fully trained are available online through MyScouting.org. Steps to set up a MyScouting.org account are available in each new leader’s packet.
Before an individual can be registered as an adult volunteer, he or she must complete Youth Protection training.
To learn more about volunteering contact the council by email or by phone (815) 942-4450.